Maybe we need to send out truant officers to find out why Black and Latino Leadership is absent from our schools!

“You’re going to force the worst teachers in the system into the schools that are struggling the most.”

“City Will Move Sidelined Teachers From Limbo to Classrooms”—
NY Times…

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/18/nyregion/absent-teacher-reserve-plan.html?rref=collection%2Fsectioncollection%2Feducation&action=click&contentCollection=education&region=stream&module=stream_unit&version=latest&contentPlacement=2&pgtype=sectionfront

The NY Times has the sense not to make me an editor; because I would change this headline from “to Classrooms”, to read: “some Classrooms”. Or, just lead with that great quote I lifted from the article, as it succinctly and correctly, sums up the proposed policy.

One thing is always true of public education: There is no such thing as a “neutral” and “inconsequential” policy. As a principal and superintendent I tried to make decisions that helped the largest amount of children; and most important (and what usually got me in trouble), protected the children who could least survive any type of systemic policy harm.

The problem arises because the students most in need of protection, have the least amount of well-organized political adults advocating for them. Like the NYC-Southeast Queens CSD 29 politician (who sincerely felt that he was giving me good advice); told me as superintendent that my advocacy and programs directed to help our very large homeless student population, would not help me to survive politically. “You know of course”, he said; “those people don’t vote!” I wish I could say his prediction about my political future in CSD 29 was wrong. Further, if you think of every policy as being a stick; certain students and communities are destined, unless there is a leadership intervention at the district or school level; to always get the short end of it!

It is so heartwarming to see so many of my former NYC Principal-Superintendent colleagues still care about the present cohort of principals fighting the good fight on behalf of children. They are speaking up and out about the deleterious effects of this policy.

But my question (And yes, you’ll know I am going to ask it!): Where are all of the “Woke” folks; the Black and Latino leaders in elected office, civic, religious, news media, the NAACP, Urban League, etc.; where is the: Black Educational Lives Matter Movement? Why is quality and effective education, not on the front end, of the movement to reform prison referral and incarceration policies? I understand the political calculus that Black and Latino politicians are facing here; however many of them are in safe seats, and can’t be seriously “primaried” by the UFT. And so, why the silence on this important issue?

Recently the Brooklyn and Bronx Borough Presidents advocated for the very doable expansion of Gifted and Talented (G&T) programs into the “G&T desert” sections of the city. They are totally correct in their assessments (of the need) and proactive positions they have taken. But where are the other Black and Latino leadership voices; is it because this issue of G&T equity is not “politically sexy” as school integration, not “sound biteble” enough to get appearances on MSNBC or CNN; into the progressive leaning online and print journals and magazines? I keep warning Black folks, that when it comes to public education, there are limits to the largesse of liberalism! My experience is that the truly progressive White Americans, seriously and passionately support quality education for all Americans!

The central, and in my view most important question is; how can we make real and significant progress if we don’t properly educate the present generation of Black and Latino students effectively? The good educational history of NYC, is the story of “generational leaps”, made possible by public education. But this “teacher placement” policy will cause many NY students of color to leap backwards; because there are plenty of studies that fully explain the results of a student being exposed to even 1, 2 or 3 consecutive years of an ineffective teacher. A child’s future should not be a lottery game.

We all know what is going to happen here, and so let’s not pretend. The least politically connected-organized parents and communities (aka the “un-entitled”), are going to get the worse teachers. These teachers will be “teaching” the children, who in actuality are in desperate need of having the best and most effective teachers in the system! We need to give a “commitment to our children” exam to Black and Latino leaders, and then grade them accordingly.