I love to read, but sometimes reading can be painful…



“A Historic Black Golf Course Faces Uncertainty as a Bidding War Over Its Future Begins…”
Washington City Paper

I never told students that sometimes reading can be painful; in part out of fear that such a comment would be discouraging. Get them hooked on reading I thought, and eventually they will discover all of the attributes of reading’s power to make us smile, laugh, learn and yes sometimes even bring forth feelings of sadness. Reading: “Johnny Got His Gun” by Dalton Trumbo in high school, was an extremely gut-wrenching experience for me, especially since all of us boys in that 1968 English class were a year away from the Viet-Nam war draft. But I am forever thankful to my English teacher for introducing me to that book; for it has taught me some life-long lessons that I still call on to this day. And as we have learned from our last presidential election, the price we pay for ignorance is far worse than any discomfort that knowledge and information brings to our ‘emotional senses’. Besides, in this nation teaching a politically disenfranchised child to read effectively is a subversive act, giving them access to books is an act of intellectual insurrection. Being able to read, in joy or sorrow, is far superior to the sorrow and suffering of not being able to read, and not reading!

But by all accounts, this article was a painful read. (One day I will learn to stop reading DC news if it conjures up such hurtful memories, but for now…) The Langston Gulf Course should be a Crown Gem of the DC-MD-VA region. It could also as I utilized it, serve as an important gateway resource for introducing Young Black and Latino Washingtonians to the sport of gulf. I tried very hard to engage the former Ward 5 Black councilman (and others) in a conversation about the great potential of this wonderful institution; in the same way I tried to get him to ‘wrap his brain around’ the great potential greatness of Phelps ACE high school for the citizens of Washington DC.; I failed on both accounts because his mind and interest were always elsewhere. We can’t blame the loss of every community institutional resource on ‘gentrification’; even if gentrifiers come along later and see pearls where we see mud.

I also think that we need to clearly define “Black Power” in the context of our current political condition. We can’t just elect a Black person to office (as wonderful as that is) and then assume that we have arrived, and our work is over. The price we pay for having unaccountable Black leaders is simply too painfully harmful and deadly.

A Historic Black Golf Course Faces Uncertainty as a Bidding War Over Its Future Begins: “This was the mecca of black golf on the east coast… Langston brought everybody together. Now, the fear is change.”

Washington City Paper: https://www.washingtoncitypaper.com/sports/article/21043261/beloved-historic-black-golf-course-langston-faces-uncertainty-as-a-national-bidding-war-over-its-future-begins

“The Unique Racial Dynamics of the L.A. Teachers’ Strike”

“The city’s public-school teachers are predominantly people of color—and a plurality of them are Latino, like most of the students they serve.”

“…Roxana Dueñas, a 34-year-old ethnic-studies teacher at a high school in Eastside L.A.’s Boyle Heights neighborhood, says her own background as an LAUSD student whose working-class parents immigrated from Mexico was a driving force behind her decision to pursue the profession. “I see myself in my students in both the literal and metaphorical sense.”

“Rodolfo Dueñas: it’s almost like you’re looking at your little brother, your little sister, and you’re reliving the traumas of education in the past,” he says. “And you’re like, ‘Dang! Some of these things are still happening.’ It’s almost like you’re fighting for something you wish you could’ve fought for when you were in school.”

Full article from The Atlantic: https://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2019/01/why-los-angeles-teachers-are-striking/580360/

http://reporttotheprincipalsoffice.net/

Why Not Have a Real NYC Specialized High School Integration Plan?

“…Some NYC politicians, civic leaders and professional educators (who should know and act better), are floating, unknowingly or cynically, a dangerous narrative: That poor performance on a high school standardized admissions exam proves that there is something ‘inherently’ wrong with the brains of Black and Latino children; thus the ‘problem’ requires an ‘admissions process’ fix, rather than an expanded educational opportunity and an improvement of learning quality fix. They either ignore or don’t know that these students not having full ‘front-end’ access to a better quality of learning and test-preparedness, are predictably doomed to suffer from academic under-achievement and test underperformance. In our present national political climate, it is probably not a wise or helpful decision to imply, even by accident, that Black and Latino children are ‘by nature’ intellectually inferior. What is inferior is the quality of the K-8 education and test-preparation too many of these Black and Latino students are receiving…”

Why Not Have a Real NYC Specialized High School Integration Plan?
Michael A. Johnson; Our Time Press

Part 1:
http://www.ourtimepress.com/why-not-have-a-real-nyc-specialized-high-school-integration-plan/

Part 2:
http://www.ourtimepress.com/why-not-have-a-real-nyc-specialized-high-school-integration-plan-2/

Michael A. Johnson has served as a public school teacher, Science Skills Center director, principal, and a school district superintendent. He also served as an adjunct professor of Science Education in the School of Education at St. John’s University. He recently completed a book on school leadership: Report to the Principal’s Office: Tools for Building Successful High School Administrative Leadership… http://reporttotheprincipalsoffice.net/

On Education: Black Child Attending an Alabama School is Bullied to Death: Did Anybody at the School see McKenzie Nicole Adam?

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On Education: Black Child Attending an Alabama School is Bullied to Death: Did Anybody at the School see McKenzie Nicole Adam? By Michael A. Johnson–December 27, 2018 “Pardon me for mentioning McKenzie’s name so often in this column. But I … Continue reading

The Amazon ‘HQ2’ Site Selection Process and the Quality of K-12 Education Factor!

The Amazon ‘HQ2’ Site Selection Process and the Quality of K-12 Education Factor!

“…My advice to cities whether choosing to compete for (or getting) an Amazon or not; is to think economic-globally by investing locally in K-12 public education. A critical mass of well educationally prepared young people will of course attract any knowledge-information-technology based corporation. But a second by-product, is the ‘growing’ of a larger number of highly skilled and well-educated adults; who are equipped with high levels of inventive-innovative thinking, and the intellectual capacity and knowledge to create their own local entrepreneurial ‘start-up’ businesses…”

Read the full article at: http://www.ourtimepress.com/the-amazon-hq2-site-selection-process-and-the-quality-of-k-12-education-factor/

Yikes! This is what keeps superintendents up at night…

Yikes! This is what keeps superintendents up at night… You supervise thousands of people, and any one of them can make a “bad” decision, completely without your knowledge, for which you are then held responsible.

“Superintendent in school kangaroo chili incident quits post”

POTTER, Neb. (AP) — A western Nebraska school superintendent has resigned just weeks after one of his school cooks mixed kangaroo meat into chili made for students.

https://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2018/10/26/superintendent-in-school-kangaroo-chili-incident_ap.html

Principals and Superintendents must live that ‘Samurai Life’; when you get up in the morning, just think that this day may be my last day… http://reporttotheprincipalsoffice.net/

Just wondering and asking for a high school principal friend…

How many adults have taken a sigh of relief this week because they had a: “doing too much”, “too strict”, “old fashion” and “don’t wanna let kids have fun” high school principal, who did not allow them to publish future career-life damaging ‘foolishness’ in their senior yearbook? Just wondering and asking for a high school principal friend… Principals you don’t need to be appreciated to be successful…

Michael A. Johnson has served as a public school teacher, Science Skills Center director, principal, and a school district superintendent. He also served as an adjunct professor of Science Education in the School of Education at St. John’s University. He recently completed a book on school leadership: Report to the Principal’s Office: Tools for Building Successful High School Administrative Leadership… http://reporttotheprincipalsoffice.net/